New Mexico residents should understand that breast cancer is possible in men, too, since men have breast tissue and even the glands and ducts for producing and carrying milk, though these are almost always non-functional. There are several types of breast cancer that are especially common among males.

Invasive ductal carcinoma, which begins in the milk duct, spreads to the fatty tissue and can spread to other parts of the body through the blood or lymphatic system, is found in 8 out of 10 male breast cancer patients. Ductal carcinoma in situ affects 1 in 10 breast cancer patients and starts in the cells lining the milk ducts. It is sometimes non-invasive (“in situ”) and sometimes pre-invasive.

A rarer form, affecting 2% of men with breast cancer, is invasive lobular carcinoma. This is found in the lobules, or milk-producing glands. Paget’s disease of the nipple is one form of cancer that’s actually found in more men with breast cancer (5%) than women (1-3%).

Men should keep in mind that not all breast cancers will form a lump. Inflammatory breast cancer, for example, is known by the way it makes the breast red, swollen and tender. Other times, men may have a lump but find out that it’s a benign tumor and not life-threatening.

Sadly, many cancer patients, both male and female, are misdiagnosed or receive the correct diagnosis at such a late stage that they incur irreparable harm. Misdiagnoses and delayed diagnoses may be the result of negligence, in which case victims may have a viable medical malpractice claim. A lawyer may be able to help them build up their case with the necessary evidence.